Brussels schools form human chain for purer air

Friday, 12 October 2018 14:19
The human chain was the last action conducted on a weekly basis on Friday mornings to attract attention to pollution around schools. The human chain was the last action conducted on a weekly basis on Friday mornings to attract attention to pollution around schools. © Belga
Several Brussels schools formed a human chain in Rue Dansaert on Friday morning, demanding purer air.
The action was the last of weekly activities organised every Friday for healthier air at school exits.

Numerous Brussels pupils formed a human chain from the Porte de Flandre up to the Bourse with a view to raising the population’s awareness of a more breathable environment at school exits. They also applauded cyclists passing nearby.

The human chain was the last action conducted on a weekly basis on Friday mornings to attract attention to pollution surrounding schools. Actions started on March 16th this year, following a Greenpeace report and a report by the VRT on air pollution outside schools. Pupils chanted, “We will continue this up to the elections!”

The numerous schools joined the movement since its launch. The Maria Boodschap primary school was the first institution behind the action. In the end, 129 schools from the various towns and communes also decided to rally behind it.

Nearly 75 schools took part in the action on Friday. At the same time, schools have organized various activities. For example, the primary school, L'Athénée of Etterbeek has, organised a giant bicycle parade around the school.

Oscar Schneider
The Brussels Times
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