Euro 2020 would have earned Brussels up to 123 million euros - researcher calculates

Thursday, 14 December 2017 17:17
Euro 2020 would have earned Brussels up to 123 million euros - researcher calculates (c) Belga
Hosting the Euro 2020 football tournament would have earned Brussels about 100.3 million to 123 million euros, l’Echo daily reported on Thursday, based on the memoir of a student of the Solvay Brussels School.
Luc Jérôme, who obtained a distinction for his work, calculated the positive economic impact of the sporting event on the basis of four scenarios. Under the most optimistic one, Brussels would have earned an estimated 123 million euros from hosting the opening match, three other matches and the press centre.

Under the second scenario, the opening match would not have been played in Brussels and under the third, the press centre would not have been located in the capital.

Under the least optimistic scenario, Brussels would not have hosted the opening match or the press centre, but four matches would have been played there. This would have earned the capital about 100.3 million euros.

Earnings for the entire country could have ranged between 130.7 million and 160.8 million euros – 22.6 million to 28.3 million for Flanders and 7.7 million to 9.6 million for Wallonia, according to Jérôme’s estimates.

The student also calculated that Euro 2020 would have enabled the creation of between 763 and 921 jobs in Brussels during the event.

Maria Novak
The Brussels Times
Google Plus

More Stories

Decree prohibiting use of non-professional weed killers approved

Decree prohibiting use of non-professional weed killers approved

The ministers’ council approved Friday a decree that prohibits the use of certain herbicides by private individuals, announced the Minister of Agriculture Denis Ducarme.

Mechelen tests self-driving delivery vehicles

Mechelen tests self-driving delivery vehicles

Saturday saw the arrival of a self-driving delivery truck in the busy shopping streets of the centre of Mechelen.

Dozens of First World War remains disinterred in West Flanders

Dozens of First World War remains disinterred in West Flanders

The remains of more than 40 soldiers who died in the First World War have been uncovered by archaeologists working on a site in Wijtschate in West Flanders province, part of the war’s main Western front and part of the battle of Passchendaele.