Sven Mary did not try to convince Abdeslam to attend trial

Thursday, 08 February 2018 15:46
Sven Mary earlier confirmed that he had not tried to convince his client to attend court today. Sven Mary earlier confirmed that he had not tried to convince his client to attend court today. © Belga
Me Sven Mary appeared shortly after 8.00 a.m. outside the Brussels Palais de Justice, where he is litigating before Brussels Criminal Court for Salah Abdeslam.
He gave a brief response to journalists who swarmed all over him, suggesting that he had not tried to convince Salah Abdeslam to attend court today.

When questioned upon the absence of his client, Salah Abdeslam, at Thursday’s hearing Me Mary indicated, speaking in Dutch, that the response to this question lay in that given by Salah Abdeslam on Monday morning before the court. He had indicated that he would exercise his right to silence, and that he was simply placing his trust in Allah.

When asked by a journalist if he had attempted to convince his client to attend court, Me Mary then simply responded laconically, “Non.” A few moments after Me Mary, lawyers in the civil case also entered the court.

Oscar Schneider
The Brussels Times
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