The city’s L'Ilot Sacre (“Sacred Island”) quarter, a tiny area with just three to four streets, used to be the place to be seen in Brussels.
The election of the European Parliament is arguably the standout EU event this year but also the one that many fear the most.
In December of 2018, Belgium’s government collapsed over ideological disagreements between the ruling parties with regards to the Marrakesh Pact, a non-binding UN migration pact drafted in July last year.

Derek Blyth's hidden secrets of Brussels

Monday, 11 February 2019 12:49
Derek Blyth is the author of the bestselling The 500 Hidden Secrets of Brussels. He picks out ten of his favourite hidden secrets in every issue for The Brussels Times Magazine. These are the picks in the latest February issue.LA FLEUR EN PAPIER DORÉThe lovely Fleur en Papier Doré is…
After the Second World War, the Belgian government wanted to have complete control over the airwaves. They consequently seized and destroyed any radio station that did not have a license. For a long time, Belgians could only listen to public radio, which had very limited programming.
The “war to end all wars” officially ended on 11 November 1918.
Few libraries in the world have experienced such a dramatic history as the library of the university in Leuven (KU Leuven).
Brussels is much more than a capital with half its territory made up of public parks and private gardens: it is actually a playground for more and more citizens willing to grow their own food, individually or collectively. And more and more businesses are taking advantage of a steady ‘eat…

Derek Blyth's hidden secrets of Brussels

Wednesday, 14 November 2018 16:04
Derek Blyth is the author of the bestselling The 500 Hidden Secrets of Brussels. He picks out ten of his favourite hidden secrets in every issue for The Brussels Times Magazine. These are the picks in the latest November issue.STROKAR INSIDEA stunning new street art hub has opened in an…
Today's Bruxellois are more than used to the city's characteristic mix of languages, backgrounds and cultures. But this hasn't always been the case. In 1960, the number of non-Belgians in Brussels stood at just 7%. By 2006, this number was 56%.