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    Few traces of radicalisation in asylum seekers centres

    © Belga
    There are few traces of radicalistion in asylum seeker centres.
    © Belga

    Since March 1st, Fedasil has only registered 66 alerts to radicalisation within asylum seeker centres, for which it is ensuring coordination. This was indicated yesterday (Wednesday) by two officials from the federal agency responsible for receiving asylum seekers. They were speaking before the investigative parliamentary commission for the terrorist attacks.

    These are alerts sent to the “radicalisation” cell of the Foreign Office, which then shares them with the various competent services (State Security, the Coordination Unit for Threat Analysis and other organisations).

    A given alert is based upon particular indices in which Fedasil staff are trained. It does not mean that a particular individual has been radicalised. The number radicalised is marginal.

    Fedasil is responsible for an average of 22,500 individuals the Policy Director, Fanny François, indicated. To facilitate the agency’s work, a federal police liaison officer has been allocated.

    The so-called “closed reception centres”, the last stage before forced repatriation, should also be able to cope with the phenomenon. Its Director, Jean-François Jacob, explained that, since March 22nd, the Vottem Centre has received several individuals categorised as radical or terrorists.

    These individuals are allocated to a specific wing in which they do not live in a communal setting, but within a form of solitary confinement. A multidisciplinary team evaluates their situation on a daily basis. The reintegration of these individuals in community wings is exceptional, indeed non-existent, so as to avoid all risk of proselytism.

    Even given this situation, alerts have taken place. In 2015, 21 alert cases occurred (conducted by the so-called “closed reception centres” or the intelligence or security services). In 2016, there were 34 cases, and this year six cases were recorded.

    Lars Andersen
    The Brussels Times