Tomorrowland – federal police “comply” with judge’s decision
    Share article:

    Tomorrowland – federal police “comply” with judge’s decision

    © Belga
    The Tomorrowland organisers have indicated that they will comply with the judge’s decision, and allow the people concerned to access the site.
    © Belga

    The federal police indicated on Thursday, “There has been a judge’s decision and we will comply with it.” This was the reaction to the verdict reached by a judge in summary jurisdiction. In its decision, the judge authorised the three complainants, who were refused access to Tomorrowland following a police screening, to attend the second weekend of the festival. This is on condition that they are subject to a further security check on entry.

    In total, 37 individuals, who bought tickets for Tomorrowland, were refused entry following following a federal police screening. The reasons for this refusal were never communicated. However, a second assessment enabled two such people to be able to access the festival all the same. That said, the negative decision was not overturned for the others.

    Three individuals then decided to appeal to the judge in summary jurisdiction, in the hope of being able to still take part in the event. The judge considered on Thursday that the fundamental rights of the festival-goers refused entry had indeed been violated. Consequently, he has authorised them to participate in the electronic music festival, provided they undergo a further police check upon entry.

    The Tomorrowland organisers also indicated that they would comply with the judge’s decision by authorising the people concerned to access the site. Earlier in the day, the spokeswoman, Debby Wilmsen, declared, “We will not prohibit them from entering the site if they wear a bracelet allowing them to enter the grounds.”

    The legality of the preventive monitoring carried out by the police in this case is currently subject to an investigation with the Privacy Commission.

    Christopher Vincent
    The Brussels Times