Brexit: a majority of Brits now favour staying in the EU
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    Brexit: a majority of Brits now favour staying in the EU

    A further Brexit referendum would, theoretically, see those favouring remaining in the EU win it by 54% of the vote. The findings come from an opinion poll made public on Monday by the British television channel, Channel 4.

    The opinion poll was carried out online recently by the company, Survation, amongst 20,000 people in all United Kingdom constituencies, between October 20th and November 2nd. It is billed as the “largest independent opinion poll on Brexit.”

    The authors of the survey in a communiqué, claim, “We now estimate that the United Kingdom would vote to stay in the EU by a majority of 54% of the votes against 46%” in favour of leaving.

    The Brexit referendum, organised on June 23rd, 2016, saw 52% of Brits support Britain leaving the EU.

    Survation explains, “Support for leaving the EU has significantly decreased in areas which recorded the highest vote in favour of Brexit in 2016.”

    The opinion poll indicates that the vote in favour of leaving the EU would theoretically decline by more than 14 points, to 48.29%, in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham.

    There is a decline of more than 10 points in several pro-Brexit cities in England including Southampton (down by 12.01 points), Sunderland (down by 10.73 points) and even Middlesbrough (down by 10.54 points).

    In the constituency of Boston (in the East of England), which had recorded the highest score in favour of Brexit in 2016 with 75.56%, the vote would fall by more than five points, to 70.36%, if a further referendum were to be held.

    Conversely in the City of London, the capital’s financial district – which voted overwhelmingly against Brexit, a surprising increase was seen (up by 1.96%, to 26.67%).

    Whilst Britain’s exit from the EU is due to take effect on March 29th, 2019, the negotiations between London and Brussels on a divorce agreement have not yet concluded. These are, in particular, coming up against a stumbling block as to how to avoid the return to a hard border between the province of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

    Lars Andersen
    The Brussels Times