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The Covid-19 pandemic in numbers

Credit: Belga

The coronavirus pandemic has caused at least 403,449 deaths in the world since it first appeared in China in December 2019, according to a summary provided by the AFP based on official sources on Monday at 1:00 PM.

Over 7,030,330 cases of infection have been officially diagnosed in 196 countries and territories since the beginning of the epidemic, of which at least 3,063,500 are today considered recovered.

The number of diagnosed cases, however, only reflects a fraction of the real number of infections. Certain countries only test the most severe cases, others prioritise tests for contact-tracing and a number of poor countries possess a limited capacity to test patients with Covid-19 symptoms.

The United States is the worst-hit country in terms of coronavirus deaths, which amounts to at least 110,514 deaths for 1,942,363 cases. At least 506,367 people have been declared recovered.

After the United States, the United Kingdom has been the most affected by the coronavirus with 40,542 deaths for 286,194 cases, Brazil with 36,455 deaths (691,758 cases), Italy with 33,899 deaths (234,998 cases) and France with 29,155 deaths (190,974 cases).

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China (not counting the territories in Hong-Kong and Macao), where the epidemic started at the end of December 2019, has officially counted a total of 83,040 cases (4 new cases were announced between Sunday and Monday), of which 4,634 deaths and 78,341 recovered.

Europe totalled, on Monday at 11.00 GMT, 183,716 deaths for 2,286,470 cases, the United States and Canada counted 118,373 deaths (2,038,062 cases), South America and the Caribbean counted 65,861 deaths (1,329,461 cases), Asia counted 19,624 deaths (697,016 cases), the Middle East counted 10,562 deaths (480,302 cases), Africa counted 5,182 deaths (190,379 cases), and Oceania counted 131 deaths (8,645 cases).

This summary was realised based on data collected by the AFP bureaus from competent national authorities and information from the World Health Organisations (WHO).

The Brussels Times