In pictures: Greenpeace protesters set EU Council building ‘on fire’
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    In pictures: Greenpeace protesters set EU Council building ‘on fire’

    Greenpeace activists wrap the EU summit venue in Brussels with images of giant flames, setting off clouds of smoke, flares and sounding a fire alarm to urge European government leaders to take immediate action to respond to the climate emergency.

    Greenpeace activists wrapped the EU Council building in images of fire and smoke on Thursday, in a striking protest meant to pile the pressure on EU leaders to tackle climate change more ambitiously.

    Greenpeace activists wrap the EU summit venue in Brussels with images of giant flames, setting off clouds of smoke, flares and sounding a fire alarm to urge European government leaders to take immediate action to respond to the climate emergency.

    The environmental group’s protest was targeting EU heads of state as they kicked off the first of a two-day summit in which discussions on the bloc’s long-term climate strategy were on the agenda.

    Greenpeace activists hold banners outside the EU summit venue in Brussels. Other activists climb the building to display images of giant flames, set off clouds of smoke, distress flares, and sound a fire alarm to urge European government leaders to take immediate action to respond to the climate emergency.

    The demonstration was set in motion before dawn break, with 61 activists arriving at the Council’s Europa building in the EU quarter at around 6:00 AM, equipped with bright helmets and jackets, ladders, protest signs — and a fire engine.

    A total of 28 demonstrators proceeded to climb up the building using the fire engine and the ladders, with Greenpeace spokesperson Sarah Jacobs saying the group had prepared for the stunt for a period of weeks.

    Greenpeace activists climb the EU summit venue in Brussels to display images of giant flames, set off clouds of smoke, distress flares, and sound a fire alarm to urge European government leaders to take immediate action to respond to the climate emergency.

    Once on top the building, the activists put up banners picturing the distinctive outside of the Europa building engulfed in flames, lighting flares and setting off clouds of smoke, in a protest promoted on social media with the hashtag: #HouseOnFire.

    Greenpeace activists wrap the EU summit venue in Brussels with images of giant flames, setting off clouds of smoke, flares and sounding a fire alarm to urge European government leaders to take immediate action to respond to the climate emergency.

    The protest was meant to “sound the alarm,” on the state of the environment under current carbon emissions, with a large banner unrolled in the centre reading: “Climate Emergency.”

    Greenpeace activists wrap the EU summit venue in Brussels with images of giant flames, setting off clouds of smoke, flares and sounding a fire alarm to urge European government leaders to take immediate action to respond to the climate emergency.

    The demonstration lasted until around noon, and ended with the arrest of 50 activists, with the incident currently being investigated by police.

    Greenpeace activists wrap the EU summit venue in Brussels with images of giant flames, setting off clouds of smoke, flares and sounding a fire alarm to urge European government leaders to take immediate action to respond to the climate emergency.

    A spokesperson for the EU Council, Katharina Pausch-Homblé, said the protest disrupted traffic but that the summit could take place without major disruptions, adding that the Council had no position on the protest, which comes a day after Commission President Ursula Von der Leyen unveiled the European Green Deal.

    Greenpeace activists wrap the EU summit venue in Brussels with images of giant flames, setting off clouds of smoke, flares and sounding a fire alarm to urge European government leaders to take immediate action to respond to the climate emergency.

    “We consider the Green Deal an aspirational effort,” Jacobs said, adding that the EU’s current proposals were “not good enough,” since they fell short of the goals adopted in the Paris Climate Agreements.

    Gabriela Galindo
    The Brussels Times