These ten professions no longer require a diploma in Flanders
    Share article:

    These ten professions no longer require a diploma in Flanders

    The measure fits in with the philosophy of lifelong learning, according to Weyts and Crevits. Credit: Wikicommons

    The Flemish government has compiled a list of ten professions that people no longer require a diploma for, if they can prove they have acquired enough skills over the years.

    The Flemish Minister for Work, Hilde Crevits, and for Education, Ben Weyts, prepared the list for which competence acquired through previous jobs, hobbies, volunteering or self-study are sufficient, if officially recognised.

    Often, job seekers do have the skills to practise such a profession, but they do not always have the required diploma to prove it. Employers have already indicated that they would definitely be willing to hire these workers, according to the Ministers, reports Het Nieuwsblad.

    The Flemish departments for Work and Education have drawn up the criteria that will be used to certify the workers’ skills. They are as strict as the ones for diplomas, and those who pass the assessment will receive a recognised professional qualification. All professions on the list are shortage occupations, meaning candidates are in high demand for all of them.

    The current professions on the list are:

    Forklift driver
    Reach truck driver
    Deboner-cutter
    Child care worker for babies and toddlers
    Child care worker for school-age children
    Garden landscaping employee
    Garden management employee
    Maintenance mechanic for passenger cars and light commercial vehicles
    Fitness coach
    Tour guide

    The measure fits in with the philosophy of lifelong learning, according to Weyts and Crevits, reports VRT. “Learning is not only done at school. You always continue to learn things, even long after you have obtained that diploma,” said Weyts.

    “In a rapidly changing labour market, retraining and further education are more necessary than ever for a sustainable career,” Crevits added.

    Maïthé Chini
    The Brussels Times