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In Photos: Seven murals to check out in Brussels

Rainbow Quarter Brussels. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

You can’t walk five minutes in central Brussels without discovering a mural.

From iconic comic book scenes that you may never have heard of to Tintin and Snowy – who you probably have – the journey through Brussels provides a snapshot into Belgium’s comic history.

If you know where to look, that is, so here are a few to get you started:

1. Victor Sackville Wall

Created by Francis Carin in May 1992, this mural presents Victor Sackville, a British spy living in Brussels. The scene depicted is from the comic “The Opera Of Death”, and shows the Rue du Marché au Charbon during WW1.

Address: Rue du Marché au Charbon 60, 1000 Brussels

Victor Sackville Wall. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

2. Ric Hochet Wall

This mural was painted in 1994 by G. Oreopoulos and D. Vandegeerde, and shows the famous comic reporter Ric Hochet. Tibet, who created the character, uses a Disney-caricatured style, which has made this street art a Brussels favourite.

Address: Rue du Bon Secours 9, 1000 Brussels

Ric Hochet Wall. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

3. Le Jeune Albert Wall

This mural honours the work of Yves Chaland, a French cartoonist killed in a car accident. This mural shows his character Le Jeune Albert, a naughty, roguish figure of Brussels, waiting for a yellow tram.

Address: Rue des Alexiens 49, 1000 Brussels

Le Jeune Albert Wall. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

4. Odilon Verjus Wall

This mural, created by Laurent Verron and Yannick le Pennetier, comes from the comic series about the missionary Odilon Verjus and his clumsy assistant Laurent de Boismenu. The star in this particular mural is the famous entertainer and civil rights activist Josephine Baker.

Address: Rue des Capucins 13, 1000 Brussels

 

Odilon Verjus Wall. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

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5. Broussaille Wall

Painted in 1991, this mural was the first of the Brussels comic book mural series. The illustration shows Brousaille, created by Frank Pé, and published in Spirou Magazine.

Address: Rue du Marché au Charbon 41, 1000 Brussels

Brousaille Wall. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

6. Tintin Comic strip wall

No matter which name you know him by, Tintin is without any doubt Belgium’s most known figure. This mural shows the character and his trusty dog as seen in “The Calculus Affair”, which was first published in 1956.

Address: Rue de l’Etuve 37, 1000 Brussels

Tintin Comic strip wall. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

7. Rainbow Quarter

The Rainbow Quarter, home to the Brussels Rainbow House, has a collection of LGBTQ-related murals with quotes. The area is also known for its LGBTQ-friendly bars, restaurant and clubs.

Address: Rue de la Chaufferette, 1000 Brussels

Rainbow Quarter. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

Rainbow Quarter. Credit: Jilke Tielemans/The Brussels Times

These murals are some of the many that can be found in the city centre. Find a full list with an interactive map here.