US elections: the 2020 race for the White House in numbers
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US elections: the 2020 race for the White House in numbers

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One week after Americans took to the polls to elect the next president of the United States, here are some of the numbers that characterised the 2020 elections.

4: Number of days that passed since Election Day before a winner could be projected. Also the number of states for which a winner is yet to be projected as of Monday 9 November. (Those are Alaska, Arizona, Georgia and North Carolina).

28: The record-breaking number of candidates who ran in the 2020 Democratic primaries.

35: Tweets posted or retweeted by President Trump that were flagged by Twitter since 4 November for disputed content or with the message “Learn how voting by mail is safe and secure” or the fact that “official sources may not have called the race when this was Tweeted”.

45: Number of electoral college votes to remain uncalled by most American media as of Monday 9 November.

46: Number of United States presidents including Joe Biden.

74: Days between Joe Biden’s election on 7 November 2020 and his Inauguration Day on 20 January 2021.

78: Joe Biden’s age when he takes office, making him the oldest President of the United States in history. The second-oldest President ever to take office is incumbent President Donald Trump, who was 70 years old on his Inauguration Day.

214: Number of electoral college votes Trump is projected to have won as of Monday 9 November according to most American media.

279: Number of electoral college votes Biden is projected to win as of Monday 9 November according to most American media.

60,000: Number of votes for Kanye West as of 7 November according to the BBC.

101,423,318: Number of early votes according to the U.S. Elections Project

71,217,969 – Number of people who voted for Trump as of 9 November. This is the second-highest number of votes for any presidential candidate in history.

75,603,406 – Number of people who voted for Biden as of 9 November. This is the highest number of votes for any presidential candidate in history.

Jason Spinks
The Brussels Times