Boris Johnson apologises for not delivering Brexit as promised
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Boris Johnson apologises for not delivering Brexit as promised

Boris Johnson apologised on Sunday for not delivering Brexit on the 31st of October like he had promised. 

He also defended his Brexit deal which had been criticised by Donald Trump. 

Will he apologise for not keeping his promise to the members of the Tory party who put him in power? “Of course,” the British Prime Minister responded to a journalist interviewing him for Sky News. 

When Johnson came to power in July, he promised to deliver Brexit on the 31st of October “whatever the cost” and claimed he would rather end up “dead in a ditch” than ask for another delay. 

But he has had to backtrack and request a new delay until the 31st of January because the deal he negotiated with the EU was not approved by Parliament. The Prime Minister expressed his “deep regrets” about that on Sunday. 

The Tory leader also criticised American President Donald Trump, his friend and ally.

When Trump spoke to British radio station LBC on Thursday, he claimed that the deal negotiated with the EU would not permit “a trade deal with the UK.”

“I don’t want to contradict the President, but in that respect, he has obviously made a mistake. Anyone who looks at our deal can see it’s an excellent one,” Johnson said. 

“The reason this delay is so painful is not because of the promises or my ego or anything else, it’s the uncertainty it creates for the whole country. The businesses that can’t prepare, the families that can’t prepare, the people that don’t know when Brexit will happen,” Johnson said. 

Johnson said he was concerned about further delays if Labour, the main opposition party, was to come to power after the 12th of December elections He said Labour’s plan to renegotiate the Brexit deal and put it to a people’s vote was “madness.” 

Johnson also said that he saw “no reason” to extend the transition period after Brexit past the previously planned date of December 2020, saying trade negotiations “should be extremely simple.”

Sarah Johansson
The Brussels Times