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    Sweden considers launching night train to Brussels

    Spurred on by interest from the Swedish government in providing more night trains to Europe, one project in consideration could link Malmö and Brussels from 2023. Credit: Christian Beiwinkel/ Wikipedia

    A night train from Brussels to Sweden could be in store in the future, according to a new study by the Swedish traffic agency.

    Spurred on by interest from the Swedish government in providing more night trains to Europe, one project in consideration could link Malmö and Brussels from 2023.

    The left-wing government commissioned a study last year to see whether more night trains from the country are possible, which has proposed a route between Malmö and Brussels, via Cologne, where the initially proposed route was meant to stop.

    “As we have deepened the investigation, we have seen that it is possible to extend the route to Brussels. Traffic to Brussels is more complex, based on capacity and technical aspects, than just reaching Germany, but still possible to implement,” Anna Fällbom, Head of Unit Agreement and Financing at the Swedish Transport Administration told the Local.

    This plan, however, is not without obstacles. The study has already estimated the line would begin at a loss of 50 million Krona (4.7 million euros) per year, and agreements are needed with the countries through which the train passes – with reports that Germany is already not on board.

    Regardless, Infrastructure Minister Tomas Eneroth has said he wants to continue working on it, he says to the Swedish news agency TT.

    In the events that these concerns – as well as some logistical issues – can be solved, the expectation is that traffic on the route could begin by 2023.

    Austria – Brussels

    In January 202, Brussels saw the launch of its first regular night train service since 2003. The new service, run by Austrian railway authority OBB, saw two trains depart from Austria, one from Vienna and slightly later one from Innsbruck. The two trains come together in the night at Nuremberg in Germany, to complete the journey to Liege, Brussels North and Brussels Midi.

    OBB announced the new service in October last year, as the latest addition to its night service to destinations in Austria, Germany, Switzerland and Italy. The Belgium train departs from Vienna and Innsbruck twice a week, on Sunday and Wednesday evenings. The return journey from Belgium takes place on Monday and Thursday. Travellers from Belgium could spend as little as two days in Vienna, arriving on Tuesday and returning on Wednesday on the next available train.

    Jules Johnston
    The Brussels Times