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    More men than women have a company car, says study

    The pay gap between men and women was also being felt in pay package extras, according to a new study published in Belgian media today.

    Within the same organisations, women were often three times less likely to receive a company car than men, according to a study made by SD Worx human resources management and Antwerp Management School published by De Standaard and Het Nieuwsblad on Tuesday. The analysis was carried out at the request of FPS Social Security and the National Office of Social Security (ONSS).

    About 17% of workers had the use of a company car, but it was mostly men who benefited, with nearly a quarter of male employees having one as against less than 12% of women.

    On the other hand, women received alternative mobility allowances more often. They were thus nearly twice as likely to receive a financial contribution to their public transport costs. They also benefited more frequently from a bicycle allowance or from another subsidy paid for travelling to work using their own car. But all these allowances, even when combined, were worth less than a company car.

    Men worked more frequently in sectors where company vehicles were common, such as IT, energy and the financial sector. Disparities between sectors could not, however, completely explain the gap.

    SD Worx also studied the figures on a gross basis in terms of the disparities between sectors, age, the number of employees working for the company and status. In organisations from the same sector and of a similar size, men were at least 2.9 times more likely to have a company car than female colleagues of comparable age and status.

    The Brussels Times