Animal rights activists ask for independent assessment after over 180 ducks died following their break-in
    Share article:

    Animal rights activists ask for independent assessment after over 180 ducks died following their break-in

    Animal Resistance is asking for assessments by an independent veterinarian. Credit: Wikipedia

    The animal rights group Animal Resistance asked for an assessment by an independent veterinarian after saying the mortality rate of these animals is “high anyway”, following their break-in into foie gras producer Callemeyn in Bekegem (Western Flanders) caused 183 ducks to die, according to Callemeyn.

    On Saturday, forty or so protestors broke into Filip Callemeyn’s firm in order to protest about the living conditions of ducks destined for foie gras production.

    “After the Animal Resistance action, 183 ducks died from stress and heart problems,” the foie gras producer said, adding that he is filing a complaint with the police, reports Het Nieuwsblad.

    “Ducks are very sensitive to stress. The activists’ noisy arrival with their cell phones was shocking. It was a threatening situation for the ducks that lasted a long time as well. 180 of them have since died,” Callemeyn, according to whom Animal Resistance’s action was primarily taken to guarantee publicity for the organisation, stated.

    “We are not surprised by his statements. It is a tactic often used to place the responsibility on others. Let them come with evidence first. That’s why we ask that an independent veterinarian be appointed to make observations in the company. In the pictures we have seen so far, there are only about twenty dead ducks, which is not abnormal. Mortality is very high in this sector,” said activist Glen Lemmens, reports De Standaard.

    According to Animal Resistance, the animals are sick, as their liver no longer breaks down fat, and they have respiratory problems. “Some animals also have ugly wounds. We have seen a duck with a hole in its mouth, through which its tongue came out. Terrible to look at,” Lemmens said. “So once again, they come up with evidence that the high mortality is a result of our action. We say it’s not. Those animals are sick because they get fat too quickly,” he added.

    Maïthé Chini
    The Brussels Times