N-VA wants to tighten law on receiving asylum seekers after ‘too much abuse’
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    N-VA wants to tighten law on receiving asylum seekers after ‘too much abuse’

    The measures are intended to reduce the influx into the Belgian reception network. Credit: Belga

    The rightwing N-VA party has submitted a bill to tighten the 2007 Belgian Reception Act, which provides material assistance like accommodation and food to asylum seekers, to reduce the influx into the reception network.

    The party no longer wants to be obliged to offer refuge to those who have submitted a multiple asylum application or have previously applied for asylum in other EU member states, and also wants these rules to apply to asylum seekers with a European nationality.

    The measures are intended to reduce the influx into the Belgian reception network.

    “The Belgian Reception Act of 2007 was well-intentioned and generously drafted, but unfortunately we have to conclude that this law has been eroded by the many abuses. A realistic correction is required,” said MPs Theo Francken and Darya Safai, reports Het Laatste Nieuws.

    In addition, they argue that a higher influx cannot be tackled by constantly opening up new places as “there is a lack of both the necessary government resources and public support for this,” they added.

    Translation of tweet: “We submitted a bill to amend the Reception Act of 2007.
    NO more asylum reception:
    – EU citizens
    – Multiple asylum applicants (not even after consideration)
    – People subject to the Dublin Regulation or recognised refugees.
    This adaptation is urgently needed to address abuse.”

    The first adjustment would mean that those who submit a multiple asylum application will no longer be allowed to stay in the reception centres. A lot of asylum seekers who are currently staying in the centres were refused asylum before, but then submitted a new application, often only with the prospect of prolonging their stay in the centres, according to Safai.

    Second, asylum seekers who previously applied for asylum in a different EU member state, will be denied in the Belgian centres. According to Safai, this will not only relieve the pressure on the entire reception network, but also have a dissuasive effect.

    A third change concerns asylum seekers from another EU country, as Francken argued that their applications have no chance, but only serve to benefit from the Belgian reception system and the medical care that goes with it.

    “In times of shortage of reception, we must dare to make difficult choices,” Francken said.

    Maïthé Chini
    The Brussels Times