Apple appeals against EU decision on its fiscal arrangement with Ireland
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    Apple appeals against EU decision on its fiscal arrangement with Ireland

    Apple appeals against EU decision on its fiscal arrangement with Ireland. The Californian group is taking legal action against the European Commission’s decision which would force it to repay 13 billion euros “in fiscal advantages gained” to Ireland.

    This is reported by several media sources today (Monday).

    Moreover, Dublin has accused Europe of infringing the country’s parliamentary souvereignty in deciding its own tax laws.

    The Chief financial Director of Apple, Luca Maestri, has criticised the European Competition Commisioner, Margrethe Vestager, for following a “political agenda”.

    Maestri confirms in the German newspaper Die Welt, “What the Commission has done here is a scandal for the European citizen. They ought to be ashamed of themselves.”

    The EU says that Apple has, for years, enjoyed fiscal advantages considered prohibited by European rules on state aid.

    Since 1980, the technology giant has had a factory in Cork. Locating here has allowed the business to benefit from the low corporation tax rates in Ireland.

    This is the reason why the European Commission has requested to reimburse 13 billion euros in the country.

    Apple has filed an application stating its argument which runs to some 50 pages, against the EU’s decision.

    The American company states that the Commission has not taken account of either Irish fiscal rules or expert opinions.

    The multinational also confirms that by acting in this way that the Commission is threatening both investment and job creation within Europe.

    The Irish authorities previously announced their intention to appeal the decision.

    The Minister of Finances stated that the “Commission has no right, per the rules on state aid, to unilaterally substitute its own decisions concerning geographical scope. Commission rulings on the geographical scope of a member state’s fiscal policy should never be substituted for the scope that the given member state already operates.”

    The Minister deplored confirming that the investigation by the European Commission started in 2014, had procedural errors, “The Commission is attempting to rewrite the Irish legislation on corporation tax.”

    Christopher Vincent
    The Brussels Times