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What are the rules for watching the Euro 2020 in Belgium?

Credit: Jules Johnston

The approaching Euro 2020 (not 2021) is the latest in a string of events facing an uncertain future due to Belgium’s ongoing coronavirus measures, leaving fans with questions on how they can watch the games.

What exactly will be allowed, especially in light of measures changing in the coming month, is still a little bit unclear due to no official announcement.

So here’s what we do know, based on the current rules, and reports:

No outdoor viewing parties in Brussels this month: Brussels fans will not be allowed to watch the European football championship on big screens in the city until at least 30 June, the Brussels Conference of Mayors decided on Wednesday. In concrete terms, this means there will be no giant screens in the nineteen communes of Brussels, nor in any large space such as the King Baudouin Stadium, during the month of June.

You could watch it on a terrace: “For the hospitality sector, on the other hand, there will be a case-by-case examination of where it is possible to install a TV screen on a terrace,” explained Close’s spokesperson.

You can’t watch from the street: The intention is also to set up the screens in such a way that “people cannot see them from outside the location,” to avoid large groups of people congregating around the event.

You will have to reserve: Organisers will likely be asked to implement a booking system.

No standing if you are drinking: Standing up is only allowed if there are no “hospitality possibilities,” meaning that if ordering drinks is an option, everyone has to sit down during the match, in groups of a maximum of four, with a 1.5-metre distance between tables, and people will be served at the table – following the same rules as the terraces of bars or restaurants.

Bars will still have to close: From 9 June (if the Consultative Committee approves), events can happen until 10:00 PM when indoors, and until 11:30 PM when outdoors.

Keep it quiet: The sound of the broadcast cannot exceed 80 decibels.

1 July is the date to watch for big changes: According to the “Summer Plan” proposed by the consultation committee, it would be possible to organise outdoor events for a high of 2,500 people from 1 July, provided that a mask is worn and a social distance is respected.

Conveniently, this would be just in time for the Championship’s quarterfinals, semi-finals and the grand final, which will all be played in early July.