Expect closures as transport, banks and post offices adapt their services for holiday weekend
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Expect closures as transport, banks and post offices adapt their services for holiday weekend

Credit: Piqsels

The Brussels public transport company STIB, the Flemish De Lijn and Belgian railway SNCB are all adapting their services for the Ascension holiday weekend ahead, while Bpost will close its offices on Thursday and Friday.

Banks will also keep their doors closed during the long weekend.

On STIB and De Lijn networks, transportation will adopt the timetable of a Sunday on Thursday, which is Ascension Day and therefore a public holiday.

The two companies will then “bridge” Friday, reducing their offered services to that of a school holiday.

Saturday and Sunday will follow the usual weekend schedule.

On the SNCB side, trains will run on Thursday according to the Sunday schedule. On Friday, the trains that run during the morning, and evening rush hour will be cancelled. On Saturday and Sunday, however, there will be no change compared to a normal weekend.

Public transport users are invited to plan their journey via their transport company’s website or mobile application.

As for Bpost, it will not deliver mail, parcels, newspapers or magazines on Thursday. All post offices will be closed, as well as collection points and MassPost centres.

Only the parcel vending machines will be operational, but they will not be restocked during the public holiday, the postal company said.

On Friday, the offices will remain closed but the rest of the services will be accessible: the delivery of mail, parcels, newspapers and magazines will be carried out normally, the “post points” and “parcel points” will open according to their specific opening hours, the parcel vending machines will be operational, and the Bpost contact centre will also be reachable.

The banking sector federation Febelfin said that banks will generally be closed throughout the extended holiday weekend, although there may be exceptions here and there.

The Brussels Times