Synatom brushes off Marghem's concerns over nuclear provisions

Monday, 28 May 2018 01:20
The Federal Minister for Energy, Marie-Christine Marghem (MR), has received a response from Synatom regarding her concerns about Electrabel's capacity to cover the cost of nuclear provisions.
La Libre reported on the story in its weekend edition. Electrabel's position has not changed and there is no reason to request further guarantees, Synatom says. They are handling the costs of dismantling their nuclear power plants themselves. 

Marie-Christine Marghem questioned Synatom after Engie pulled 1.6 billion euros in shares from its Electrabel branch. There were concerns that Engie wanted to progressively remove Electrabel's assets and leave it to go bankrupt if the costs of the nuclear provisions got too high in the future. 

Synatom says Electrabel has sufficient funds to allow it to do what is legally required. 

Mrs Marghem says that Synatom's responses will be analysed to determine if they are satisfactory. Synatom itself is a branch of Electrabel. 

Synatom has agreed to improve how things are run by using independent administrators in management. 

Andy Sanchez
The Brussels Times
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