Half of workers say they can choose how to achieve their objectives

Thursday, 06 September 2018 18:25
Near half (49 %) of workers affirm they themselves can choose methods or techniques used to achieve their work objectives is what comes out of the biennial study led by human resources services group Acerta, published Thursday.
“The function of the team head has been changing for the last several years: the head is becoming a ‘boss on request’,” analyzes Acerta Consult’s head, Peter Tuybens.

The 1,700 interviewed workers have a clear idea of an executive officer’s role: leading and coaching, taking one’s responsibility, being communicative, stimulating teamwork, solving problems, planning.

This presupposes dialogue with staff. But if 63% benefit from an annual interview with their team head, at least once a year, this is not the case for 37% of workers, 59% of whom regret it.

Almost half of the workers say they can choose how to achieve their objectives. But the degree of freedom varies. Only 13 % have an income budget that they allocate themselves in salary and benefits, and 53% do not choose with whom they work. Forty-three per cent can organize their own work schedules.

“Employers who do not spontaneously discuss with their workers about their talents, expectations and ambitions are missing out on a huge potential. But the one who opts for a culture of dialogue and encourages his/her collaborators to become the best version of themselves will enjoy the harvested benefits. Most workers want this dialogue, which shows that it is a constructive process for all,” Peter Tuybens comments in a communiqué.

The survey was conducted by the Indiville office.

The Brussels Times
Google Plus

More Stories

Family of toddler shot dead by police may stay in the country

Family of toddler shot dead by police may stay in the country

The family of Mawda Shawri, the two-year-old shot dead by police during a car chase as they were entering the country illegally, have been granted a residence permit to allow them to stay in Belgium for at least a year, migration minister Maggie De Block has decided.

Saliva collection to be used to curb driving under the influence of drugs

Saliva collection to be used to curb driving under the influence of drugs

The Cabinet of Ministers on Friday approved a royal decree allowing the use of saliva collection devices to determine whether a motorist is driving under the influence of drugs.

More than half of Brussels’ homeless have lived on the streets for more than a year

More than half of Brussels’ homeless have lived on the streets for more than a year

Nearly 60% of homeless people questioned during the ‘Face-à-Face’ (Face-to-Face) action for accommodation, had not had secure and permanent accommodation for over a year.