FGTB calls for minimum-wage hike for hotel, restaurant workers

Monday, 01 October 2018 18:29
FGTB calls for minimum-wage hike for hotel, restaurant workers © Belga
The branch of the General Federation of Belgian Labour that represents employees of the food, beverages and hospitality sector, FGTB Horval, is calling for gross hourly wages in establishments such as hotels, bars, cafés and restaurants to be increased to 14 euros.
Members of the union will gather on Thursday morning in Wilrijk, outside the headquarters of the Bemora, which brings together many important players in the sector.

“The Government is using the (1996) law on salaries, invoking the need for competitiveness with neighbouring countries, to limit the maximum-wage-increase to the minimum,” FGTB Horval charged. It called for “a structural approach to improve buying power”.

Thursday’s symbolic action is part of the “Fight for 15 dollars” campaign launched in the United States to press demands for a U.S.$15-per-hour minimum wage, particularly in fast-food chains.

Andy Sanchez
The Brussels Times
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