Fortune in Belgian gold coins found in France

Sunday, 10 June 2018 09:35
Fortune in Belgian gold coins found in France ©Belga
Demolition workers in the French town of Pont-Aven in Brittany have uncovered a fortune in Belgian gold coins worth €100,000.
The coins date back to 1870, and show the notorious king Leopold II on the reverse. There are 600 coins in the consignment.

The workers were in the process of demolishing an uninhabited house when they came upon a lead object in the shape of an artillery shell. Upon investigation, it was found to contain the 600 gold coins. Each has a face value of 20 Belgian francs, although the value in today’s terms is much higher.

“The owner of the house was not surprised, because he knew his grandfather was a coin collector,” the director of the demolition company told French media.

The find has now been sealed by the French gendarmerie. Under French law, the value of the hoard is to be divided equally between the finders and the owner of the land on which the treasure was discovered.

Alan Hope
The Brussels Times
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