Half of France turns red, Italy almost fully orange on European travel map
Share article:
Share article:

Half of France turns red, Italy almost fully orange on European travel map

Credit: Pexels/Griffin Wooldridge

Europe is turning less and less green with each update to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)’s travel map, as almost all of Italy has turned orange on Thursday.

Especially the popular holiday destinations are doing less well than in the previous update, as the south of France turned red, most of Italy turned orange, and the island of Sardinia even turned red.


In France, there are no green regions left on the map, and the Department of Île-de-France, which includes Paris, is now coloured red.

The regions of Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, Occitanie and Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, all in the south of the country, have also gone red. The regions of Bourgogne and Centre-Val de Loire, which were previously green, have now turned orange.

Spain, which was already coloured fully red in last week’s update, is only turning darker red. Only the regions of Murcia and Castilla-La Mancha are still a “regular” red, while the rest of the country has gone dark red.

Portugal, which has been coloured red for some time now, remains red.

Related News:

 

While Italy was still mostly a green zone last week, it is now almost entirely orange. Only the regions of Valle d’Aosta, Piedmont, Basilicata, Apulia, Molise and Abruzzo are keeping their green colour.

Additionally, the popular Italian island of Sardinia now also turned red.

Greece is also shifting more and more towards becoming a fully red zone, as only Thrace and Central Greece are still orange in the latest update.

Additionally, Central Denmark is now coloured red. Iceland (which has been green for a long time) turned orange again, as did Estonia, northern Norway and the Austrian area of Salzburg.

The European colour codes are used by Member States to impose conditions on returning travellers, such as mandatory testing or quarantine. The colour code of a region is also taken into account for the admission of travellers in their own countries.

Member States cannot impose extra restrictions on travellers coming from a green area, but they could demand a negative test and/or quarantine from (unvaccinated) people coming from orange zones.